MANIFESTO

Manifesto - selected quotes - area: metaphysics

[THE SOUL AND BEYOND]

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[402] "However, what is the soul to us? Do we really have a soul or, as some want to believe, are we ourselves that soul? Possessing a soul would mean that we as individuals possess something which is "ours" and is part of us. But really, who are "we"? After all, everything we receive during what we refer to as existence is not ours. First of all, it was not us who caused our birth nor was it our parents - they were merely "transmitters", limited in their will. They could have decided not to have a child, but at the moment of deciding to do have one they had no control over what was to happen or who would be born. Also, the only thing we do throughout our entire life is process the energy that already exists. We feed on matter that exists, breathe air that exists, think about things that do not exceed God's work of creation, thus they exist, function according to patterns which already exist and pass through us and we are formed by energies which also already exist."
[403] "So what do we have that is actually our own? Rather not much, not to say: NOTHING. What then authorizes us to use words like "we" or "our soul"? The only thing we have of our own is the possibility to distinguish ourselves as the memory of a moment of God's work of creation and remember what happens in our life. It is our memories that build us. We are a trace and memory, not form and shape. This is why the most important thing is the memory of events. However in order for memory of events to occur something that we can remember must happen first. And the more joyful the events and thus the remaining memories, the more fulfilled we will be at the time of our death."
[404] "What we do throughout our life is solely "use" a small area of God's work of creation assigned to us, shaping it according to "our wish", however not going beyond what the Creator allows us. Everything we do during our lifetime is... nothing more than playing on the beach and building a sandcastle. We give the space we use whatever form we want, we play by thoughtfully shaping the walls of our castle, its towers, fortifications, moats, we even put a flag up on top to indicate that the castle belongs to us, that it is "us". And that's it. That is our whole life. And then it gets dark, the night falls, and we have to depart, leave all of our toys and our castle behind. The castle returns to its original form of sand particles waiting for the next person who is about to build a new castle, call it his or her life, and give that castle another name of "I"."
[405] "It is possible that the human being's (a sensitive human being, perhaps a shaman) first conscious glimpse of himself - whether it was seeing his body: arms, legs, torso, or seeing his reflection in water - caused us to distinguish in ourselves our second part - our soul. Looking at our body, moreover at our reflection, when some "strange" face was looking back at us, we did not really see "ourselves" (because it was us looking), but some other person. As a matter of fact, through logical reasoning we knew that it had to be us, but on the other hand it was "us" who saw that there was a physical body assigned to "us". Our consciousness thus stood next to the body assigned to it, conferring two somewhat different and independent beings upon the body and itself."
[406] "After its physical life the body must die - and that is what the consciousness opposes, because it has gotten used to experiencing the known pleasure of everyday life and it fears the unknown. The consciousness does not want to die, that is why it creates for itself (and for others - through the development of beliefs and religions) a perspective of further life upon leaving its physical shell. It is our consciousness that wants to be immortal, retaining its entire consciousness and memory of events. Whereas from the perspective of the body it is the consciousness which is the soul that has a chance, as the nonmaterial part of us, to continue living in another world extending our duration to immortality and thus defeating physical death."
[407] "What seems to be far fetched and grounded only in the realities of past earthly realms is the linear idea (e.g. Christianity, Islam) that the immortal (or even mortal in some sense) soul retains the consciousness of the dead and enters another world upon the death of the body, waiting for God to finally judge it for its earthly deeds, bringing it to justice at the end of times - either eternally rewarding or condemning it. It is far fetched and barely coherent and from the point of view of the laws of nature: a complete squandering of energy sentenced to be eternally confined either in paradise or hell."
[408] "What seems to be more plausible is the idea of reincarnation and subsequent incarnations of the alleged soul (e.g. Hinduism, Buddhism, and partially also Christianity up until the 6th century), constituting a repeatable cycle in some sense, although punishing or rewarding it for either "good" or "bad" behavior in a previous incarnation is not much of a credible attempt of transferring human values to the broader world of God."
[409] "There are scientific premises to acknowledge that the "soul" can exist, which stem from some studies indicating that sometimes especially little children (3-4 year-olds) are able to remember the lives of third persons who died a natural death or (more frequently) died in a tragic accident. There are attempts of regressing in hypnosis to deep memories of "past incarnations" of the people tested. When subjected to studies both little children as well as adults are able to freely provide details which they were not able to obtain from others and which overlap the facts from the dead persons' lives. (...) It is impossible, however, to deduce any certain conclusions about the mechanisms of the functioning of energy flows after a person's death and the types of these energies based on these traces. Numerous further research is essential based on which we as humanity will be able to say more about who we are and whether and in what form our life has a chance of existing after the physical death of our body."
[410] "Taking into account, however, the cohesion and unity of the work of creation, the size of the creation (even if only considering the range available to human observation), the scale of the complexity of its processes and their excellent equilibrium as well as the existence of extra-sensory areas and the programmed constraints of human consciousness in accessing these areas, then there is a strong likelihood that something "beyond" exists - something beyond human life, also after physical death, although it most likely diverges from the human expectations of eternal life..."
[411] "The philosophy/religion of Ra'i does not intend to take an unambiguous stance both in terms of the concept of existence of the human "soul" as well as its potential form, because all that could possibly be said on that topic is based solely on previous religious speculations resembling "crystal-ball gazing". (...)"
[412] "(...) We are expressing our stance only towards the necessity of at least a conventional definition of the foundations of the soul, solely for the present needs of our followers, basing on the premises contemporarily available to human. (...) Therefore the stance expressed below should be treated not as a permanent, but a temporary conventional framing of the problem."

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[415] "This energy of self-awareness assigned to our individual being, which accompanies us throughout our life and which humans could possibly understand as the soul, first and foremost is not us or our consciousness, but an external energy activating and coordinating or steering the process of the functioning of our individual (self-) awareness and enabling us to use collective superconsciousness and higher energy of the Creator, and secondly - it retains only our energetic trace, the mark of our existence, a lifelong record of our mind's emotions, a peculiar energetic matrix of the history of our existence. At the moment of our physical death we cease to receive and use life energy, whereas the energy of self-awareness becomes unleashed and returns to the source of the energy of consciousness, common to all "complex beings". Simultaneously, the matter remaining in the physical world does not disappear either, although it changes its external form returning to the process of chemical cycling."

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[421] "This would be the best paradise for the human being. A projection of everything that was most beautiful to us - the last, but eternal, multidimensional as in a wonderful dream and exceptionally vivid, interactive flashback of our whole life, all of our joys and happiness, all those who loved us and whom we loved, amazing smells, tastes, touches, thoughts, kisses, loves, our first life problems, first school grades, our childhood, youth, adolescent children, grandchildren, friends, loving wife, loving husband, and the last images of sun rays entering a room through a window. In short, everything that was dear, wonderful, and joyful to us - this paradise, made up of marvelous vivid memories deprived of earthly desires and worries, would be granted to us as a projection eternally suspended in nonexistent time..."
[422] "Regardless whether you are an atheist or a believer, regardless of which God you believe in, you would surely rather remain in a dreamy, wondrous image of your life's memories, of your loved ones, and the joys and happiness you had together, than to be eternally suspended in either non-existence or some undefined, mythical, and completely strange "paradise". Let each one of us, however, have our own vision of life on the other side. Let us not take away anyone's hope to receive what they believe in and how they believe in it."